Cost of College

Central+Washington%E2%80%99s+Barge+Hall+was+the+first+building+to+be+constructed+on+the+University+campus%2C+and+is+used+for+enrollment+management%2C+admissions%2C+alumni+relations%2C+student+union+and+student+account+management.+Central+Washington+University+was+one+of+the+many+colleges+that+raised+their+tuition+costs+for+those+wanting+to+partake+in+higher+education+courses.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Cost of College

Central Washington’s Barge Hall was the first building to be constructed on the University campus, and is used for enrollment management, admissions, alumni relations, student union and student account management. Central Washington University was one of the many colleges that raised their tuition costs for those wanting to partake in higher education courses.

Central Washington’s Barge Hall was the first building to be constructed on the University campus, and is used for enrollment management, admissions, alumni relations, student union and student account management. Central Washington University was one of the many colleges that raised their tuition costs for those wanting to partake in higher education courses.

Steven & Nadine Pavlov

Central Washington’s Barge Hall was the first building to be constructed on the University campus, and is used for enrollment management, admissions, alumni relations, student union and student account management. Central Washington University was one of the many colleges that raised their tuition costs for those wanting to partake in higher education courses.

Steven & Nadine Pavlov

Steven & Nadine Pavlov

Central Washington’s Barge Hall was the first building to be constructed on the University campus, and is used for enrollment management, admissions, alumni relations, student union and student account management. Central Washington University was one of the many colleges that raised their tuition costs for those wanting to partake in higher education courses.

Konner Ivarson, Staff Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Many parents hope for their kids to continue their education after high school. Attending these colleges, however, costs large amounts of money that a student may not have right out of high school, and the student may require heavy financial support.

The cost of education is way too high in the United States for any person to handle and will likely take years to pay off. In order for people to pay for college, they need to get student loans and will have to slowly pay the loans back over time. When the cost of college is high and the student cannot work a lot because of college classes, the amount of debt they will be put in is astronomical.

“Of course, plenty of students take on debt to get a degree,” said Katie Lobosco, a graduate of Gettysburg College that received a master’s degree in business journalism from New York University. “Forty million Americans now have at least one outstanding student loan, with an average balance of $29,000.”

A large part of a graduate’s life is making sure the payments are on time and will reach the total amount of the loan, even if only the minimum monthly amount is being payed. If a graduate doesn’t gain a good understanding of financing, the graduate will be financially illiterate, which puts him or her at a heavy financial disadvantage.

“Someone could have a family and not be able to support them. Their credit would be terrible,” junior Dylan Janetos said. “Having terrible credit makes it hard to purchase a house, car, and getting a loan.”

This high cost of college and their illiteracy in financing will send college students into an abyss of debt that will cripple them financially for years. Students who work during college to reduce debt are relieved of some financial stress, but are in turn hit in other crucial areas of their life.

“Sometimes I had to skip out on playing video games with friends or going out with them,” junior and Central Washington University Running Start student David Lee said. “And sometimes I need to stay up late or get up early to finish homework and stuff.”

Working and learning at the same time, all while dealing with financial issues, is a hassle. Sometimes even just college can be too much for some students´ social life.

“It’s tricky to balance, but I usually make a mental list of what I need to do and adjust it when something else happens,” junior and Running Start participant Gretchen Hinchcliff said. ”I have an alarm for when I study and do homework and have certain days when I visit with friends and work.”

The hard balance between social life and financial status is tricky and difficult to manage without eventually becoming so overwhelmed with stress that one’s brain cannot function efficiently. Because of the high cost of college programs that many cannot afford, some high school graduates choose not to go to college.Wealthy people do not have to worry as much about financial struggles, but many of the less fortunate crash and burn in piles of debt.

“I would say that college is good, but it depends on what you want to go into,” former Kittitas Secondary School student Garrett Hill said. “If it’s something like welding, go to a trade school and don’t spend the extra money to go to a fancy college. You can get a degree or certified in less time and it will cost less.”

The impoverished will need to resort to much less expensive options for higher education, like something other than college, and even then they might not be able to fully afford it without loans or scholarships. Loans and scholarships, however, will provide a significant amount of support for those less fortunate.

“I do agree that the high cost of college repels students that are less fortunate,” Janetos said. “The problem I have is someone who has more money than someone shouldn’t have to be not go to college because someone has more money than someone else. It’s hard for low income people to pay for the high cost of college.”

However, there are many financial assistance programs that the United States offers such as benefits from being in the military, grants, scholarships and work study programs.

“Despite the moderate increases in average published prices, there were considerable increases in net tuition and fees over the past few years,” said Jennifer Ma, a policy research scientist at the College Board. “These increases, combined with stagnant incomes for many families, raise concerns about ensuring educational opportunities for low- and moderate-income students.”